1984, by George Orwell: the forces of the Party against the forces of humanity

Some expressions coined by George Orwell in 1984 are so well-known today that I had a familiar feeling when finally, I started reading this novel. I had already read about the principles of Newspeak (the absolute opposite of what writers work for and what readers appreciate) and of course I knew that 1984 was where … Continue reading 1984, by George Orwell: the forces of the Party against the forces of humanity

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Mrs Dalloway, by Virginia Woolf: on madness, regrets, and the elusive quality of time

There are several forces at work in Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway, forces opposing one another or complementing each other, which makes of Virginia Woolf's most popular novel a shining object of endless fascination, throwing its multiple and multicoloured sparkles in all directions, so that it is impossible to fully grasp the extent of Mrs Dalloway's depth … Continue reading Mrs Dalloway, by Virginia Woolf: on madness, regrets, and the elusive quality of time

The Custom of the Country, Edith Wharton: portrait of an avid and dangerously beautiful woman

"Even now, however, she was not always happy. She had everything she wanted, but still she felt, at times, that there were other things she might want if she knew about them." The Custom of the Country, Edith Wharton. Here are described Undine Spragg's insatiable desires, extending their claws of avidity towards things she cannot … Continue reading The Custom of the Country, Edith Wharton: portrait of an avid and dangerously beautiful woman