Girl Meets Boy, by Ali Smith: about imagination and gender fluidity

Ali Smith wrote Girl Meets Boy more than ten years ago, in 2007, and it was my first introduction to her writing, again thanks to Canongate Books. A rewriting of one of Ovid's most joyful metamorphosis, Girl Meets Boy adds to this mythological story a modern perspective which gives yet another depth to the myth of Iphis … Continue reading Girl Meets Boy, by Ali Smith: about imagination and gender fluidity

Erotic Stories For Punjabi Widows, by Balli Kaur Jaswal: empowering women through writing (and erotic tales)

"Nobody eavesdrops an old lady chatter. To them it's all one buzzing noise. They think we're discussing our knee pain and funeral plans." This remark, made by one of the sassy old ladies that people Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows, is both funny and profound, for it speaks, as does the novel, of a social phenomenon … Continue reading Erotic Stories For Punjabi Widows, by Balli Kaur Jaswal: empowering women through writing (and erotic tales)

Foe, by J.M. Coetzee: decolonizing the classics

This week's topic for Our Daughter's Daughter's Society, on Instagram, (check this link if you want to see the posts and contact @sarahs89reads and @paperbacking if you want to join) was modern retellings of older tales and as Sarah chose to write about Wide Sargasso Sea, I decided to write my review, at long last, on Foe by … Continue reading Foe, by J.M. Coetzee: decolonizing the classics

Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott: the ambiguous feminism of a classic from my childhood

Little Women, published in 1868, is one of these books which made their way through the decades and continue to fascinate and rejoice us with their grace, their wit and their tenderness. I was a huge fan of Little Women when I was a kid. I read it twelve or thirteen times; I could relate to each of the girl's main feature … Continue reading Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott: the ambiguous feminism of a classic from my childhood