White Teeth, by Zadie Smith: fundamental interrogations on the fundamentals

I think it is a secret for no one here that I love Zadie Smith. I admire her wit, her style, her sense of humour, her cleverness and sagacity. I'm in awe at the fact that she began her career as a writer in her early twenties, and that her first novel, White Teeth,  was none … Continue reading White Teeth, by Zadie Smith: fundamental interrogations on the fundamentals

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Homegoing, by Gyaa Gyasi: Making a home for lost voices

"This is the problem of history. We cannot know that which we were not there to see and hear and experience for ourselves. We must rely upon the words of others." These are the words of one of the many characters in Homegoing, and they sound like an invitation, if not an instruction on how … Continue reading Homegoing, by Gyaa Gyasi: Making a home for lost voices

Anatomy of a Soldier, Harry Parker: writing for re-humanising

[Version française ci-dessous] Reviewing Anatomy of a Soldier is something I have been postponing for months.  Harry Parker's first novel is a real little gem that I'm afraid to damage with a clumsy review. Rarely have I read something so delicately balanced between the horror of war and the poetry of its telling. The story is … Continue reading Anatomy of a Soldier, Harry Parker: writing for re-humanising

The Namesake, by Jhumpa Lahiri: accidents, immigration and identity

My balcony, my cherries and I just finished reading for the second time Jhumpa Lahiri's first novel, The Namesake. Although this second reading has revealed some flaws in the novel (minor inconsistencies, some events I found difficult to believe in), it has left me the same sweet and melancholy feeling than when I first read … Continue reading The Namesake, by Jhumpa Lahiri: accidents, immigration and identity