White Teeth, by Zadie Smith: fundamental interrogations on the fundamentals

I think it is a secret for no one here that I love Zadie Smith. I admire her wit, her style, her sense of humour, her cleverness and sagacity. I'm in awe at the fact that she began her career as a writer in her early twenties, and that her first novel, White Teeth,  was none … Continue reading White Teeth, by Zadie Smith: fundamental interrogations on the fundamentals

Anatomy of a Soldier, Harry Parker: writing for re-humanising

[Version française ci-dessous] Reviewing Anatomy of a Soldier is something I have been postponing for months.  Harry Parker's first novel is a real little gem that I'm afraid to damage with a clumsy review. Rarely have I read something so delicately balanced between the horror of war and the poetry of its telling. The story is … Continue reading Anatomy of a Soldier, Harry Parker: writing for re-humanising

The Namesake, by Jhumpa Lahiri: accidents, immigration and identity

My balcony, my cherries and I just finished reading for the second time Jhumpa Lahiri's first novel, The Namesake. Although this second reading has revealed some flaws in the novel (minor inconsistencies, some events I found difficult to believe in), it has left me the same sweet and melancholy feeling than when I first read … Continue reading The Namesake, by Jhumpa Lahiri: accidents, immigration and identity